Vinyl, A Record-Breaking Comeback


Despite the emergence of modern technology and music playing or streaming devices, vinyl records are making their comeback, against all odds.

There has been a crazy growth in the sales of vinyl records over the last five to six in an age of easily accessible music streaming sites and devices. What is making the comeback?

Rabittfoot Records & Coffee Lounge in Sanford, FL
Courtesy Sanford365.com

Rob Wallace, owner of Rabbitfoot Records and Coffee Lounge in Sanford, FL Florida explains to us that one of the biggest reasons for the comeback of the vinyl record really has to do with the experience of the listener. He explains that a true music lover actually loses something out of not having a physical, collectible copy of their favorite music even though they can hold 10,000 songs in the palm of their hands. While the sound format may be different, there is something of satisfaction out of having an actual recorded disc that holds your favorite tunes. What brought young people to the forefront of the vinyl revolution is the physical property of having something to hold and take care of.

Just because a person may collect vinyl records does not mean that that is the only way that music should be enjoyed. Vinyl records capture an experience for the listener to appreciate and in turn, the listener has a high level of appreciation for the particular listening format.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MAina4g3xkUA major advantage that vinyl has over its other counterparts is the art and the packaging of the vinyl. Back in the mid to late 80s, commercials began to air that urged us to indulge in the new way of listening to music through CDs. The major push was actually due to big labels and multinational conglomerates getting greedy. These companies worried more about finding new ways to save money and stopped paying attention to the important parts such as content packaging or the album’s artwork. What CDs have that records do not, however, are low bass frequencies and high treble frequencies. The only problem with that is that these differences are nearly inaudible to humans. “The problem is that those things that are being added to the music aren’t actually adding anything to the music. Frequencies that you can’t even hear aren’t doing much for us while the nuances ushered midrange can’t be captured in cd format,” Wallace explains.

A major advantage that vinyl has over its other counterparts is the art and the packaging of the vinyl. Back in the mid to late 80s, commercials began to air that urged us to indulge in the new way of listening to music through CDs. The major push was actually due to big labels and multinational conglomerates getting greedy. These companies worried more about finding new ways to save money and stopped paying attention to the important parts such as content packaging or the album’s artwork. What CDs have that records do not, however, are low bass frequencies and high treble frequencies. The only problem with that is that these differences are nearly inaudible to humans. “The problem is that those things that are being added to the music aren’t actually adding anything to the music. Frequencies that you can’t even hear aren’t doing much for us while the nuances ushered midrange can’t be captured in cd format,” Wallace explains.

“The problem is that those things that are being added to the music aren’t actually adding anything to the music. Frequencies that you can’t even hear aren’t doing much for us while the nuances ushered midrange can’t be captured in cd format,” Wallace explains.

Let’s take a deeper look on the costs of a record versus a CD. Packaged and out the door, the cost of a record was between the $2 and $3 mark in the 80s-90s. During that same time, a CD that was packaged and out the door at a cost less than $1. After the release of a record, the total cost was approximately $10 whereas a CD would cost anywhere from $15 and up. The profit margin was exponential and that was reason enough for records to fall through the cracks and the rise of modern CDs. In terms of artistic integrity, art was left in the dust.

You can listen to the full interview with Rob Wallace here.

How many vinyl records do you own?

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Samantha Whilden
Samantha Whilden is actively finishing her Music Business degree at Full Sail University and is a first time writer for DHN-TV.

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Vinyl, A Record-Breaking Comeback

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